Is my will valid?

Photograph of Jeanne Mance's will (1672), copi...

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The basic formalities required for the execution of a Will are as follows:

The document must be signed by the testator.

The Will must be signed at the end of the document (as opposed to the bottom of the page). This simple provision, which often trips up an inexperienced testator, has led to many Wills being declared invalid.

If the Will consists of a single page, it must be signed at the end of that page.

If the Will consists of more than one page, each page must also be signed by the testator.

Recent amendments to the Act brought about certain relaxations in the execution of Wills, one of which was that the definition of the term ‘signed’ is not limited to refer only to a full signature, but also includes the testator’s initials.

The testator must sign his Will (or confirm his signature) in the presence of two or more competent witnesses, who must be present at the same time.

The witnesses must also sign the Will, although, in their case, they need merely to sign at the end of the document and not on each page if the document consists of more than one page.

The witnesses must sign in the presence of each other and the testator.

For best practice, we recommend that the witnesses sign each page, as well as at the end of the document. We also recommend that all parties sign in full on each page.

It is not necessary to have an attestation clause or even to date a Will for it to be valid. However, it is important to date a Will because it makes it easier to determine the sequence, if the testator has left behind more than one valid Will, and so, to ascertain whether it is the Last Will and Testament or whether the document has since been revoked, or is revoking another Will.

The Act determines that

via Is my will valid? – Lexology.

Dice loaded against black women in business

A dentist by profession, she started her business supplying medical equipment to state hospitals nine years ago.

In spite of her impressive professional qualifications – a Medical University of SA dentistry degree, an honours degree from Stellenbosch University and a masters from the University of Pretoria – she battled to find a bank or institution willing to consider her business plan, never mind give her a loan.

Even state funding entities set up to advise and finance small and medium enterprise start-ups were not interested, she says.

“Culturally, you’ve got problems.

“In Africa, the woman is regarded as someone who has to take care of her family full time and nothing else.

“And banks do not believe in funding entrepreneurs who are female.

“When you go to the banks, they do not believe you are capable of doing it.

“Men are the only people who can succeed in running a business.

“We are supposed to be employed or in the kitchen.

“When you come with a business plan to a bank they resist, they don’t believe it will succeed.”

Eventually a bank agreed to give her a R30000 overdraft.

“They were better than other banks which rejected me altogether. They didn’t even want to hear my story.”

Mzizana is outraged that institutions the government started with the express purpose of financing small businesses, and which are forever trumpeting their achievements in this area, showed her the door as quickly as any of the commercial banks.

“These are organisations that claim to be helping women’s businesses. They are actually not doing that at all.

“That’s why there are no women businesses that are successful. They open and within one year they’ve closed down.

“If you keep going for five years you’ve done very well as a woman.”

via Dice loaded against black women in business – Business LIVE.

Success for SA designer

Clothing in store, ready to wear, off the rack...

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Johannesburg – South African-born fashion designer and entrepreneur Lesego Malatsi has gone from stitching ready-to-wear garments in a Soweto township mall set amid shanties to savouring the sweet success of London’s fashion week.

Malatsi had his first international show at the weekend in the British capital, where he displayed a collection of new-look African prints at the Fashions Finest event backed by Richard Branson‘s Virgin Unity initiative.

“Honestly, you don’t know how to prepare,” Malatsi said from London in a telephone interview with Reuters.

Malatsi has taken a long road to London that started in a tiny home in Soweto.

He first tried his hand at accounting after leaving high school, but a stint at a cosmetics company altered his career aspirations.

“(It) changed my mind and how I saw things,” he said.

He then studied fashion at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology and has been making clothes since.

via Success for SA designer: Fin24: Entrepreneurs.